Nepal

Getting there & around

Entry Requirements
You need to have a passport with at least six months remaining validity.
All, except Indian nationals, need visa to enter Nepal. Tourists can stay for a maximum of 150 days in a visa year (Jan 1 to Dec 31), extending the visa at the rate of 2 USD per day. However, a minimum amount of 30 USD has to be paid for a period of 15 days or less.
For further information, please contact Department of Immigration.

Flights
Kathmandu is the only international airport in Nepal and you can fly directly to Kathmandu from Doha, Dubai, Dhaka, Karachi, Abu Dhabi, Bahrain, Paro, Lhasa, Guangzhou, Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Hong Kong, Bangkok, New Delhi, Mumbai, Patna, Calcutta and Varanasi.
There are a number of International Airlines with direct flights to Kathmandu: Austrian Airlines, Thai AirwaysQatar Airways,
Gulf Air, Air China, Indian Airlines, Air Sahara, Birman Bangladesh Airlines, Jet Airways, Pakistan International AirwaysDruk Air.

Transport
There are many different forms of transportation available in Nepal and you will likely find that you will have to use a combination of a few different types in order to get from one destination to the next.
Bus ride in Nepal can be rather unique experience of sharing your seat with a duck, or perhaps a goat. Bus routes are extensive and will take you to most sections of the city or town. Tourist buses can be reserved through a travel agent or the hotel. These are a better option from the cleanliness and crowding viewpoint. Private taxis are available to take you from the airport to your hotel. “10 Rupee” taxis can be a bit dodgy and will only move when completely full, leaving you feeling much like a tinned sardine does. Two-stroke rickshaws are another travel option if you are going a relatively short distance and do not have too much baggage. The bouncy ride can be quite fun, but remember to bargain a good price. Three-wheeled tempos or micro-buses can carry up to 13 passengers and travel set routes through the city. Tempo vans take the same routes, but are much safer though they cost a bit more.

By bus
At the bottom of the heap are the local buses that run shorter routes, carry people, their luggage and often animals, and seem to stop more than they go and in relative terms they're incredibly cheap. They run pretty much everywhere and will stop for anyone. You can jump on local buses anywhere, but you'll find it much easier to get a seat if you catch a bus at its source rather than in mid-run. For longer-distance buses, it's best to book a pretty much everywhere and will stop for anyone. You can jump on local buses anywhere, but you'll find it much easier to get a seat if you catch a bus at its source rather than in mid-run. For longer-distance buses, it's best to book a couple of days in advance.
On popular tourist runs such as the Kathmandu-Pokhara, Kathmandu-Sunauli and Kathmandu-Nagarkot runs, there are a number of higher-grade, higher-priced and sometimes air-conditioned tourist buses aimed at the tourist market.
On the longer routes there are 'express' minibuses, scheduled both by day and night. Day travel is generally preferable because you get to see the countryside (and there are some spectacular roads) and it's considerably safer. Night travel often involves a stop somewhere en route for a couple of hours sleep.
At the bottom of the heap are the local buses that run shorter routes, carry people, their luggage and often animals, and seem to stop more than they go.

By Car & motorcycle
There are no drive-yourself rental cars available in Nepal, but you can easily hire cars with drivers, or just a taxi. Expect to pay between 50 USD and 60 USD per day, including fuel. Remember that you'll have to pay for the driver's return trip whether or not you yourself return, as well as his food and accommodation for overnight trips. Motorcycles can be rented in Kathmandu and Pokhara.

By train
There are not many train stations in Nepa, but this does not mean that you should not consider using the Nepalese railways as a possible form of transport between certain countries and cities in Nepal.
There is a total of 59 kilometers of railway in Nepal. This is not a lot compared to many other countries, but it is enough to provide fast and cost-effective transport between Janakpur and Jainagar. The majority of this is ‘narrow gauge’ railway. While the country does not have any rail links with China, it certainly does share one with India. Jainagar is situated close to India and many people use the trains to travel between India and Nepal every day. One very popular train station in Nepal is the New Jalpaiguri Station.